Booth/Vendor Events

By | November 4, 2010

Do’s and Don’t’s of working these events… 

DO greet people with casual conversation. Start with a sincere non-sales comment like “your baby is darling, how old is he?” –or- “that is a great sweater!” –or- “you look like your having a fun day!”. Make an observation, followed by a sincere comment as a conversation starter to break the ice and THEN ask if they are familiar with your company. That way, you are a person before you are a sales person…make sense? 

DON’T hide behind your display with your nose in a book and say something lame like “if there’s anything you need help with, just ask!” 

DO carry some cash and carry items if your company allows that, to sell and display it like a store. This is one way to help you cover the overhead involved in your booth costs. Also, people feel much more comfortable if they can purchase on the spot vs. ordering and awaiting delivery. 

DON’T overload your table with too much inventory. Displaying at a variety of heights is great. Consider using an empty box upside down and covered with a clean tasteful cloth to add interest. Bookstands or simple shelving can also be an option. Usually the price point is $15 and under at these events. If you accept credit cards, be sure you have a sign displayed that indicates that. 

DO stay in your booth! 

DON’T wander around and leave your booth unmanned for customers to fend for themselves while you “network” with other vendors. If there are no customers it’s fine, but keep your booth in your line of vision. 

DO consider bundling or some inexpensive (under $40) gift baskets if your product line lends itself to that. If you have a higher priced product, consider one of your products teemed with some inexpensive add-ons that you can pick up elsewhere. When pricing the basket, be sure to factor in your cost in materials (like the basket, filling and cellophane). 

DO talk about getting your products free by hosting and DO have recruiting information prominently displayed! 

DO observe your neighboring vendors. In downtimes pick their brains for what they find works and doesn’t work for them. You may also find they have information on other booths in the area that are coming up. BUT REMEMBER, your customer is the first priority, so only network when things are slow! 

DO work these types of events! They provide GREAT practice in talking to people, selling your product and your company. Remember practice makes perfect! 

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